Chad Walker, Ph.D.


Research - Teaching - Impact

Threats to energy democratization: Examining the structure of decision-making processes and new spheres of procedural (in)justice in energy transitions


In Energy Democracies for Sustainable Futures


Chad Walker, Stacia Ryder, JP Roux, Patrick Devine-Wright, Zoe Chateau
Majia Nadesan, Martin Pasqualetti, Jennifer Keahey, chapter 34, 1st , Elsevier

https://www.elsevier.com/books/energy-democra...
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APA
Walker, C., Ryder, S., Roux, J. P., Devine-Wright, P., & Chateau, Z. Threats to energy democratization: Examining the structure of decision-making processes and new spheres of procedural (in)justice in energy transitions. In M. Nadesan, M. Pasqualetti, & J. Keahey (Eds.) (1st ). Elsevier.

Chicago/Turabian
Walker, Chad, Stacia Ryder, JP Roux, Patrick Devine-Wright, and Zoe Chateau. “Threats to Energy Democratization: Examining the Structure of Decision-Making Processes and New Spheres of Procedural (in)Justice in Energy Transitions.” In , edited by Majia Nadesan, Martin Pasqualetti, and Jennifer Keahey. 1St . Elsevier, n.d.

MLA
Walker, Chad, et al. Threats to Energy Democratization: Examining the Structure of Decision-Making Processes and New Spheres of Procedural (in)Justice in Energy Transitions. Edited by Majia Nadesan et al., 1St , Elsevier.


In parallel with recent community-led action, published research within energy democracy [1,2] and energy justice [3,4] has proliferated over the past decade. Though nascent, advancements are being made rapidly in both sets of literature, which include critical reviews offering extensive discussions on these emergent bodies of literature [5–7]. In this chapter, we respond to some of the noted shortcomings in the literature by (a) linking energy democracy to a wider theory of democracy, and (b) providing empirical evidence to ground energy democracy-related analyses. We use contrasting case studies from Canada and the United States to contribute to the conceptual debate on different understandings of energy democracy and how these manifest in diverse democratic contexts. Moreover, we showcase the importance of thinking pragmatically about the challenges of employing the concept of energy democracy in relation to regional (or non-local) energy policy. Our aim with these case studies is to demonstrate how emergent social movements' actions to resist, reclaim, and restructure facets of a wider energy system [2]can politicize the deployment of energy infrastructure. Unlike the majority of the literature, our case studies also draw attention to other dimensions of democracy beyond direct citizen involvement to demonstrate democracy in practice across multiple governance scales and in different energy infrastructure and national contexts. In some instances, these processes involve the use of established democratic institutions (e.g., provincial elections in Ontario, Canada) to further 318 34. Contested scales of democratic decision-making and procedural justice in energy transitions group interests across multiple governance scales. Further, our case studies illustrate how different types of infrastructure [onshore wind energy and unconventional oil and gas (UOG)] can shape democratic politics and how these facets may interact in different ways over space and time.  

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